The past is back

I have often been asked to suggest books for understanding ancient healing in China, and despite the many texts that exist, this simple request is usually very difficult to fulfil. I would like to suggest Zhang Jingyue’s Leijing《類經》,  Leijing Tuyi, 《類經圖翼》, and for acupuncture Zhenjiu Jiayi Jing《針灸甲乙經》,and 《子午流注針經》, but I know that most people find... Continue Reading →

Yinyang Wuxing Yi versus TCM

Abstract There is a need to differentiate old style yi (醫), healing work, from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). The perspective on life, spirit, body, health and illness in yi are based on the principles of yinyang wuxing. In contrast, TCM tends to favour a modern biomedical view of the body, health and illness. The ancient... Continue Reading →

Yinyang Wuxing Yi Course

Happy Lunar New Year I haven’t blogged for a while, but I haven’t been idle either. Recently I’ve been working on a comprehensive course on yinyang wuxing yi and this year I hope to provide the course online and perhaps at certain physical locations. What the course covers will include five subjects taken consecutively: yinyang... Continue Reading →

Can yi and biomedicine work together?

Most people who access Chinese traditional healing services also tend to access biomedicine services. Thus it might be considered desirable that biomedicine and traditional healing work together and complement each other. To begin with, the question whether yi and biomedicine could work together might suggest some kind of lack in either yi or biomedicine. I... Continue Reading →

Dreams are your spirit speaking

A qigong healer came to see me and said that every night for a week, he dreamt that he was a woman. He and his wife were friends from childhood and had been happily of married for 20 years. He asked: “Am I meant to be a gay?” Kidney is a water organ; water reserves the entire body's yang heat. Yang heat in the... Continue Reading →

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑